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Creating an Ethnic Statement by textile design artist Bina Rao

Date:     Sunday, June - 21, 2009
Time:    2:00 p.m
Location:   Palo Alto Art Center
1313 Newell Road, Palo Alto, CA 94303
Tel. 650.329.2366

The Society for Art & Cultural Heritage of India (SACHI), and The Palo Alto Art Center are pleased to present an illustrated talk: Creating an Ethnic Statement by textile design artist Bina Rao

Sunday, June 21, 2:00 p.m.
Palo Alto Art Center
1313 Newell Road, Palo Alto, CA 94303
Tel. 650.329.2366
Free Admission and Open To The Public

Textile scholar and design artist Bina Rao merges contemporary design trends with traditional weaving and printing techniques using handspun yarn and natural dyes. As advisor to a number of state and central government agencies in India, Ministry of Textiles, and the World Crafts Council, Bina Rao is dedicated to the healthy growth of handlooms and handicrafts in India and Southeast Asia.

The survival of craft traditions is at a crossroad. Can natural yarns, colors, and going ethnic help to revitalize the rapidly disappearing craft legacy and its adverse impact on rural artisans? Hear Bina Rao discuss the revival of traditional techniques for creating unique design products, involving training clusters of rural weavers, and linking them to the Hyderabad based design studio, Creative Bee, begun with her husband Kesav Rao, a master dyer and accomplished artist. A sampling of designer fabrics will be available for sale.
Bina Rao received her MFA in Painting from Maharaja Sayajirao University of Baroda, India, and studied Textile Design at the National Institute of Design in Ahmedabad. She has been invited to lead workshops, teaching assignments, and lecture and design development projects in Australia, USA, Thailand, Malaysia, and Bangladesh.

Kabir Festival at Stanford

Date:     Friday, May - 08, 2009
Time:     4-6 p.m
Location:   Bldg 200, room 203

Four films and a concert open the worlds of a great poet of fifteenth-century North India, Kabir, and his living presence in South Asian music, religion, and society today. A provocative and challenging figure who can’t be pinned down by any religious label, Kabir is admired by Hindus, Muslims, Sikhs, secularists, and atheists, as well as by followers of the Kabir sect who claim him as a God. A profound mystic to some, a biting social critic to others, a Dalit hero to others, Kabir is all of these things and more. His presence today can be sought in multiple social locations and in vibrantly diverse forms of music.

Four new documentary films by Shabnam Virmani will be screened. The films highlight folk and classical musicians who sing and reflect on the poetry of Kabir; the films also tell stories, revealing issues that arise around Kabir’s presence in a variety of social, religious, and political contexts in India and Pakistan. The culmination of the festival will be the arrival of the filmmaker and of renowned Kabir folksinger Prahlad Singh Tipanya with his musical group on May 8, when we will screen the fourth film, followed by Q&A with the director, a dinner, and a live concert.

CO-SPONSOR: Society for Art and Cultural Heritage of India (SACHI)

SCHEDULE OF EVENTS: Descriptions of the films can be found at www.kabirproject.org. For further info, contact Prof. Linda Hess, lionda@stanford.edu

Thurs., Feb. 12, 7 p.m., film in Bldg 300, room 300
Had-Anhad—“Bound-Unbound”: Journeys with Ram and Kabir (105 min.)

Mon., Feb 23, 7 p.m., film in Bldg 200, room 205
Koi sunta hai: “Someone is Listening”—Journeys with Kumar and Kabir (96 min.)

Mon., Apr 20, 7 p.m., film in Bldg 200, room 203
Chalo Hamara des: “Come to my country”—Journeys with Kabir and friends (97 min.)

Friday, May 8 4-6 p.m., location TBA
Kabira khada bazaar mein: “In the market stands Kabir”—Journeys with Sacred and Secular Kabir (94 min.), followed by Q&A with the director and singer Prahlad Tipanya, who is featured in the film

6:30-7:30 Outdoor dinner (reservations required, modest charge to cover costs)

7:30-9:30, Concert in Annenberg Auditorium, Cummings Art Building Prahlad Singh Tipanya, renowned folksinger of Malwa, Madhya Pradesh, with fellow musicians Ambaram Tipanya, Ajay Tipanya, Vijay Tipanya, and Devnarayan Saroliya

Program at UC Berkeley

Thursday, Feb. 5, 2009, 5 pm – Film Screening – 10 Stephens Hall
Had-Anhad—”Bound-Unbound”: Journeys with Ram and Kabir (105 min.) Discussant: Vasudha Paramasivan (UC Berkeley)

Thursday, Feb 26, 2009, 5 pm – Film Screening – 10 Stephens Hall
Koi Sunta Hai: “Someone is Listening”—Journeys with Kumar and Kabir (96 min.) Discussant: Linda Hess (Stanford University)

Thursday, Mar 19, 2009, 5 pm – Film Screening – 10 Stephens Hall
Kabira Khada Bazaar Mein: “In the market stands Kabir”—Journeys with Sacred and Secular Kabir (94 min.) Discussant: Vasudha Dalmia (UC Berkeley)

Thursday, Apr 30, 2009, 5 pm – Film Screening – 10 Stephens Hall
Chalo Hamara Des: “Come to my country”—Journeys with Kabir and friends (97 min.) Discussant: Shabnam Virmani (Director)

Friday, May 1, 2009, 6 pm – Music Concert – Stephens Hall Terrace Prahlad Singh Tipanya and Party

PRAHLAD SINGH TIPANYA lives in Lunyakhedi village in the Malwa region of Madhya Pradesh, near the cities of Dewas and Ujjain. A rural schoolteacher, he began singing in the late 1970s after being attracted by the sound of the folk tambura. His rare talent, passion, and insight have caused him to be increasingly recognized as a remarkable exponent of Kabir’s music and meanings. Among many other honors, he received the prestigious Sangeet Natak Akademi award in 2008. (Sangeet Natak, India’s national academy of music, dance, and drama, gives eight annual awards to musicians, only one of which is reserved for a non-classical performer.) Tipanyaji is one of the main artists featured in Shabnam Virmani’s films. A grant for the musicians’ international travel has been generously provided by the Indian Council for Cultural Relations.

Award-winning filmmaker SHABNAM VIRMANI has spent the last six years producing four feature-length documentaries on living Kabir culture, focusing on music and musicians, all embedded in various social, political and religious contexts. Along with these films she has produced ten remarkable audio CDs and a set of beautiful books to accompany CDs and DVDs. This work has been generously supported by Ford Foundation and by Srishti College of Art, Design, and Technology in Bengaluru, where Shabnam is artist-in-residence. Two of these films were recently broadcast on NDTV-Delhi. Had-Anhad: “Bound Unbound” was one of two films selected to share first prize at the recent One Billion Eyes Film Festival in Chennai. For descriptions of the films and other creations, please visit www.kabirproject.org.

Stanford faculty member LINDA HESS has been translating and writing on Kabir for many years and has worked closely with Prahlad Tipanya and Shabnam Virmani since 2002. She is author, with Shukdeo Singh, of The Bijak of Kabir (Oxford University Press, 2002). Her book Singing Emptiness: Kumar Gandharva Performs the Poetry of Kabir is forthcoming from Seagull Books (http://www.seagullindia.com/books/forthenactment.asp), and a book on Kabir oral traditions in rural Madhya Pradesh is in progress. Prof. Hess will introduce these events.

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An afternoon of conversation and food with Niloufer Ichaporia King, anthropologist and award-winning author of My Bombay Kitchen: Traditional and Modern Parsi Home Cooking

Date:     Sunday, May - 03, 2009
Time:    4:00-7:00 pm
Location:   Home of Zarine & Neville Batliwalla 70 Tobin Clark Drive Hillsborough, CA 94010

Join SACHI in an afternoon of conversation and food with Niloufer Ichaporia King, anthropologist and award-winning author of My Bombay Kitchen: Traditional and Modern Parsi Home Cooking.

Sunday, May 3, 4:00-7:00 pm
Home of Zarine & Neville Batliwalla
70 Tobin Clark Drive
Hillsborough, CA 94010

In the relaxed setting of a private house on a Sunday afternoon, fellow Bombay-ite and SACHI friend, Kamini Ramani, chats with Niloufer about the historical and cultural background of Parsi cuisine and the stories behind her engaging book. Before we eat, drink and resume conversation, Niloufer will introduce the dishes to be served and talk about their role in both Bombay’s gleefully ecumenical food scene and the Parsi kitchen.

Anthropologist, scholar, teacher and cook, Niloufer Ichaporia King studies tropical cuisines, plants for food and medicine, and food as an expression of both cultural change and stability. Born in Bombay, now Mumbai, Niloufer King has lived in the Bay Area for over thirty years. In the course of studying Design and Anthropology at the University of California, Berkeley, she developed an exhibition, Sons of Vishvakarma: The Artisans of India for the Phoebe Hearst Museum of Anthropology. She also compiled two collections which included rapidly disappearing ethnographic material from Hong Kong and from her own Parsi community.

My Bombay Kitchen: Traditional and Modern Parsi Home Cooking (University of California Press, 2007) chronicles the food of one Parsi family spanning three generations and two continents.

Kamini Ramani is a once-and-forever Bombayite who has sampled Parsi treats at the homes of her legendary professors at Elphinstone College. She is delighted to help SACHI provide Bay Area food enthusiasts a peek into a unique woman and a unique cuisine.

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Palaces of British India: Madras, Calcutta, Bombay, the Hill Stations & New Delhi

Date:     Sunday, March - 29, 2009
Time:    4:00-6:00 pm
Location:   Home of Bipin & Rekha Shah 91 Mount Vernon Lane, Atherton, CA 94027

Palaces of British India:
Madras, Calcutta, Bombay, the Hill Stations & New Delhi

An Illustrated Talk by distinguished architectural historian Robert Grant Irving

Sunday, March 29, 4:00-6:00 pm
Home of Bipin & Rekha Shah
91 Mount Vernon Lane, Atherton, CA 94027
Refreshments will be served; free admission

Political purpose and architectural splendor were closely allied in the palaces built for British-ruled India. Illustrations for this lecture will depict edifices in seventeenth and eighteenth century Madras and Calcutta, second city of the British Empire, and the “City of Palaces”; the High Victorian leviathans of Bombay; the remarkable Viceregal hillstation of Simla, celebrated by Kipling’s Tales from the Hills; and the swan song of imperial architecture, the impressive capital of New Delhi, created by renowned architects Edwin Lutyens and Herbert Baker.

ROBERT GRANT IRVING was educated at Balliol College, Oxford; King’s College, Cambridge; and Yale University. A Fellow of Berkeley College at Yale, he has taught at Yale, Wesleyan, Trinity College, and the University of Virginia. Dr. Irving has lectured worldwide, and has held research grants in India, Africa, Britain, and the United States, including a Fulbright Scholarship and a John Simon Guggenheim Fellowship. His book, Indian Summer, on the creation of New Delhi, won the British Council Prize as well as the highest honor of the Society of Architectural Historians, the Alice Davis Hitchcock Book Award.

Special thanks to Rekha & Bipin Shah, Arvind Iyer, Helen & Raj Desai, and Michio Yamaguchi. 

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The Dragon’s Gift: The Sacred Arts of Bhutan A Conversation with Curator Emeritus Terese Bartholomew

Date:     Sunday, March - 15, 2009
Time:    11:00 am and 12:15 pm,
Location:   11:00 am, Lecture
12:15 pm, Bhutan exhibition tour

The Dragon’s Gift: The Sacred Arts of Bhutan
A Conversation with Curator Emeritus Terese Bartholomew

Sunday, March 15
11:00 am, Lecture
12:15 pm, Bhutan exhibition tour

Samsung Hall, Asian Art Museum
200 Larkin Street, San Francisco

Free with museum admission
Space is limited and reservations are required
For reservations call 650.624.8888 or email nazehler@aol.com
Co-sponsored with the Asian Art Museum of San Francisco

Providing a glimpse at the more than eight years of research, negotiation and preparation, curator emeritus Terese Bartholomew introduces the enigmatic kingdom of Bhutan and the objects on view in The Dragon’s Gift: the Sacred Arts of Bhutan.

The Dragon’s Gift is an unprecedented exhibition exploring the remote and mystical Himalayan kingdom of Bhutan. On public display for the first time are sacred objects such as thangka paintings, sculptures and textiles, many of which are actively used in rituals and religious ceremonies. Making this exhibition unique, most of the pieces on display are from working temples and serve as consecrated objects of worship. Two monks from Bhutan accompany the exhibition, performing daily rituals and prayers, a required tradition for many of the sacred objects on display.

Humanities West presentsIndia Rising: Tradition Meets Modernity

Date:     Friday, February - 27, 2009
Location:   Herbst Theatre, San Francisco

Humanities West presents
India Rising: Tradition Meets Modernity
February 27-28, 2009
Herbst Theatre, San Francisco

India’s artists, in pace with their country’s rapid modernization, have adopted many contemporary techniques. Yet past traditions remain strong. Familiar themes and modern modes of expression interplay with fruitful creative tension. Abstract and surrealist artists incorporate images of legendary gods and heroes in their work, and musicians create exciting new sounds in collaboration with Western jazz and classical performers. Literature and cinema with rural village scenes compete with others featuring urban landscapes, Indian-American cultural fusion, and the seductive joys of Bollywood. The result: unique new delights for the eye, the ear, and the spirit.

In Partnership with the Center for South Asia Studies, University of California Berkeley and the Music Department, University of California Santa Cruz.
SACHI is a Cooperating Partner with Humanities West

Learn more about pre-program and program events

• Learn more about this program’s presenters

• Suggested Reading and Resources for this program

• Download the brochure for this program

A Conference at University of California, Berkeley: Recovering Afganistan’s Past

Date:     Friday, November - 14, 2008
Time:    9am - 5pm
Location:   Chevron Auditorium, International House, University of California, Berkeley

A Conference at University of California, Berkeley
Recovering Afghanistan’s Past
Friday, November 14 and Saturday, November 15, 2008
9am – 5pm

Chevron Auditorium, International House, University of California, Berkeley
For detailed conference schedule, please visit http://ieas.berkeley.edu/events/2008.11.14w.html
Free admission to the talks on the Berkeley campus

This conference will focus on Afghanistan’s cultural heritage in its past and present contexts and bring together scholars from various disciplines to address, among others, the following issues: the recovered objects from the National Museum; recent research and preservation/renovation projects; challenges of cultural heritage protection; the complexities of “targeted” heritage; cultural heritage and nationalism; and cultural heritage and globalization.

The conference has been organized in conjunction with the Afghanistan: Hidden Treasures exhibition which is on display at the Asian Art Museum October 24, 2008 through January 25, 2009.

Sponsors:
Center for Buddhist Studies (CBS), Al-Falah Program for Islamic Studies (CMES), Townsend Center for the Humanities, Center for South Asia Studies (CSAS), Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies (ISEEES), History of Art Department, Society for Asian Art, Association for the Protection of Afghan Archaeology (APAA), California State University-East Bay, Consulate General of France, Society for Art and Cultural Heritage of India (SACHI), and International House.

Society for Art and Cultural Heritage of India (SACHI)
Annual Meeting and Lecture in Honor of Peg Haldeman
Co-sponsored by the Asian Art Museum of San Francisco

Early Wall Paintings at Bundi by Dr. Milo C. Beach

Date:     Sunday, October - 19, 2008
Time:     2:30pm
Location:  
Samsung Hall, Asian Art Museum
200 Larkin Street, San Francisco

Early Wall Paintings at Bundi by Dr. Milo C. Beach

Sunday, October 19, 2008, 2:30pm
Samsung Hall, Asian Art Museum
200 Larkin Street, San Francisco
Free with museum admission

The most important early wall-paintings in Rajasthan can be found in the Badal Mahal in Bundi Fort, the greatest painted space in Rajasthan. Carefully conceived as a program of related images, and accompanied by an important group of paintings on paper, they also help to illuminate the development of painting at neighboring Kota.

Distinguished guest lecturer Dr. Milo C. Beach is former director of the Freer and Sackler Galleries, Smithsonian Institution. He is a renowned scholar of South Asian painting and author of numerous books and articles, including most recently The Silk Road and Beyond: Travel, Trade, and Transformation (Art Institute of Chicago, 2007) and Rajasthani Painters: Bagta and Chokha, Master Artists at Devgarh (University of Washington Press, 2005).

Rupayan: Spectacular Folk Music Ensemble from Rajasthan in collaboration with Kalapriya

Date:     Saturday, October - 11, 2008
Time:    6:30 pm
Location:   Campbell Recital Hall
Braun Music Center
541 Lausen Mall
Stanford University

ACHI, the Society for Art & Cultural Heritage of India,
RANA, Rajasthan Association of North America,
Stanford University’s Abbasi Program in Islamic Studies
and the Center for South Asia, jointly present

Rupayan: Spectacular Folk Music Ensemble from Rajasthan
in collaboration with Kalapriya

Saturday, October 11, 2008, 6:30 pm
Campbell Recital Hall
Braun Music Center
541 Lausen Mall
Stanford University

Free Admission, Limited Seating.
RSVP 650.353.7846 or email sachi@gmail.com
Please note: New RSVPs will be waitlisted only

The Thar Desert region of Rajasthan has nurtured one of the most vibrant and evocative music cultures of the world. Rupayan is on tour with eight performers from the Langa and Manganiar communities of hereditary professional musicians, initially organized by the late ethnomusicologist and folklorist Komal Kothari of Jodhpur. They have performed in more than 200 venues in thirty countries.

The Langas and Manganiars are Muslim musicians who have traditionally performed for both Hindu and Muslim patrons. Many of their songs are in praise of Hindu deities and celebrate Hindu festivals such as Diwali and Holi. They also sing the poetry of South Asia’s great Sufi poets.

The performance will be accompanied by narratives, and includes translations of selected song texts and a lively Q & A with the artists.

Directions: From Hwy. 101 take University Ave. exit to downtown Palo Alto. University Ave. becomes Palm Drive as you enter the Stanford campus. Turn left on Campus Drive. Turn right on Mayfield Ave. and right into Tressider parking lot. Campbell Recital Hall in the Braun Music Center is located across from Tressider Union.

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Divided we Fall: Americans in the Aftermath

Date:     Saturday, June - 28, 2008
Time:    12:30 pm to 2:00 pm
Location:   Yerba Buena, Center for the Arts Screening Room
701 Mission @ 3rd
San Francisco, CA 94103

SACHI, The Society for Art & Cultural Heritage of India
and Yerba Buena Center for the Arts
present DIVIDED WE FALL: Americans in the Aftermath
A powerful feature-length documentary film in the aftermath of 9/11

Driven to action by the murder of a turbaned man in her community, a college student drives across America in the aftermath of 9/11 to discover stories that did not make the evening news. From the still-shocked streets of Ground Zero to the desert towns of the American West, Valarie Kaur’s inspiring journey uncovers remarkable stories of hate, violence, fear, and unspeakable loss–until she finds the heart of America halfway around the world, in the words of Balbir Sodhi’s widow. Five years in the making, Divided We Fall deftly explores race, religion, and identity in times of national crisis.
(110 minutes)

Filmmaker Valarie Kaur & Director Sharat Raju will be present for Q&A
Moderator, Professor Linda Hess, Co-Director,
Center for South Asia, Stanford University
Open to the public

12:30 pm: Lunch catered by Samovar Tea Lounge
2:00 pm: Film screening

Saturday, June 28, 2008
Yerba Buena Center for the Arts Screening Room
located on the Terrace Level of the Galleries
and Forum Building at 701 Mission @ 3rd
San Francisco, CA 94103

Watch film clips and reviews at www.dwf-film.com